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Welsh, Stuart

Adjunct Professor of Ichthyology

Stuart Welsh is an Adjunct Professor of Ichthyology in the Wildlife and Fisheries Resources program at WVU. He is also a Research Fisheries Biologist with the U.S. Geological Survey where he serves as the Assistant Unit Leader of the West Virginia Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit.  He earned a B.S. in Wildlife Resources from West Virginia University, an M.S. in Fisheries Management from Frostburg State University, and a Ph.D. in Forest Resource Science from West Virginia University.  Stuart has been at WVU since 2000.  His research interests include the natural history, ecology, zoogeography, and systematics of fishes and crayfishes. Specifically, he is interested in the natural history, ecology, and geographic distributions of native and nonnative species, habitat relationships, movement and migration ecology, and taxonomy and systematics. He has published more than 60 scientific articles and served as an advisor to more than 30 graduate students. He teaches a graduate level class in ichthyology at WVU.

Select Publications

  • Hedrick, L., J. Anderson, S. Welsh, and L-S. Lin. 2013. Sedimentation in mountain streams: a review of methods of measurement. Natural Resources 4:92–104.
  • Welsh, S.A., D.R. Jerry, D.W. Burrows. 2014. A New Species of Freshwater Eel-tailed Catfish of the Genus Tandanus (Teleostei: Plotosidae) from the Wet Tropics Region of Eastern Australia. Copeia 2014:136–142.
  • Ruble, C.L., P.L. Rakes, J.R. Shute, and S.A. Welsh. 2014. Captive propagation, reproductive biology, and early life history of the Diamond Darter ( Crystallaria cincotta). American Midland Naturalist 172:107–118.
  • Welsh, S.A., J.L. Aldinger, M.A. Braham, and J.L. Zimmerman. 2016. Synergistic and singular effects of river discharge and lunar illumination on dam passage of upstream migrant yellow-phase American eels. ICES Journal of Marine Science 73:33–42.
  • Loughman, Z.J., S.A. Welsh, N.M. Sadecky, Z.W. Dillard, and R.K. Scott. 2017. Evaluation of physiochemical and physical habitat associations for Cambarus callainus (Big Sandy Crayfish), an imperiled crayfish endemic to the Central Appalachians. Aquatic Conservation: Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems 2017:1–9.
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